Exhibitions

Past exhibitions

Bruno Mouron & Pascal Rostain, "Jack Nicholson", 1996 from "Star Trash", Lambda print on aluminium, 120 x 220 cm, Courtesy and photo: The artists © Bruno Mouron & Pascal Rostain
Bruno Mouron & Pascal Rostain, "Jack Nicholson", 1996 from "Star Trash", Lambda print on aluminium, 120 x 220 cm, Courtesy and photo: The artists © Bruno Mouron & Pascal Rostain
From Trash To Treasure. The Value of Worthless Things in Art

November 5, 2011 – February 26, 2012

Jacques Lacan asserted that how we deal with rubbish reveals the state of the civilization we live in. So, in a way, we are what we throw away. How objects, subject matter, or situations are considered garbage is a generally accepted strategy that pervades every area of society and is part of contemporary culture and everyday life. With the last financial crisis there is much talk of rubbish assets, and today’s issues are gigantic patches of garbage floating on the sea's surface, man-made debris in space, and our trash culture. As a result we increasingly focus on recycling, re-evaluation, and converting the leftovers of our consumer world.

The exhibition From Trash to Treasure: The Value of Worthless Things in Art shows a selection of art strategies—dating from the early 20th century to the present—that explore the subject of garbage. The show investigates the volatile issue of refuse: how we define rubbish, its potential, and how it can be exploited, and, often with a touch of humor, pursuing such issues from political, economic, and cultural perspectives.

Arman, Catherine Bertola, Joseph Beuys, Karsten Bott, George Brecht, Jürgen Brodwolf, Pavel Büchler, Peter Buggenhout, Christo, Tony Cragg, Jürgen Drescher, Marcel Duchamp, Sylvie Fleury, Gilbert & George, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, Tina Hauser, Jan Henderikse, Robert Jacobsen, Ray Johnson, Asger Jorn, Arthur Køpcke, Igor und Svetlana Kopystiansky, Korpys/Löffler, Alicja Kwade, Urs Lüthi, Gordon Matta Clark, Olaf Metzel, Robert Morris, Bruno Mouron & Pascal Rostain, Wilhelm Mundt, Vik Muniz, Raffael Rheinsberg, Gerd Rohling, Mimmo Rotella, Dieter Roth, Karin Sander, HA Schult, Kurt Schwitters, Daniel Spoerri, Johan Strandahl, Philip Topolovac, Jacques de la Villeglé, Wolf Vostell, Robert Watts, Diet Wiegman, Markus Zimmermann.

Timm Ulrichs, "Ohne Titel (Kanaldeckel 1962/64)", 1970, Fotoschablonierte silk-screen print on cartoon, 60 x 60 cm, Kunsthalle zu Kiel © Timm Ulrichs Photo: Martin Frommhagen
Timm Ulrichs, "Ohne Titel (Kanaldeckel 1962/64)", 1970, Fotoschablonierte silk-screen print on cartoon, 60 x 60 cm, Kunsthalle zu Kiel © Timm Ulrichs Photo: Martin Frommhagen
Changing Values. Materials – Objects – Motifs

November 5, 2011 – February 5, 2012

At the beginning of the 20th century, accepted notions about art materials underwent a radical re-evaluation, laying the foundations for a totally new understanding of what a work of art is. Prior to this, the material used in the creation an artwork was, so to speak, absorbed by and subservient to the latter. Thus, for example, painted objects can replicate the original or reality so closely that we can almost mistake the one for the other—if the brushstrokes are subdued and the application of paint concentrates just on imitating the object. With the dawn of modernism, however, objects we encounter everyday began to be used for creating art much like the traditional artists' materials such color, marble, or paper. Marcel Duchamp’s readymades, Kurt Schwitters’s montages of materials, and, later, the art of the Nouveaux Réalistes—who used real objects in the 1960s—all share the common characteristic of using everyday or found objects to make art.

Developed by the cubists, papier collé (pictures of glued paper) became important especially for the graphic arts. It involved making an artwork out of found fragments such as clippings from newspapers, pieces of wallpaper, or cuttings from oilcloth. The artistic value of such materials lies in their dual signification: 
On the one hand they are formal and aesthetic components of a picture and, on the other, are symbolic for a reality existing beyond the work of art. The works in the exhibition document how corks of wine bottles, paper scraps, worthless paper money, and even a manhole cover can expand the world of art and open up new realms of subject matter where art and reality conflate to form a novel synthesis.

Thorsten Brinkmann, "Vasall van Bröckl", 2011, C-Print, 195 x 150 cm © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2011 (Detail) Gottfried Brockmann, "Der Pfeifenbaum", 1929, 38,5 x 30 cm © Estate Gottfried Brockmann
Thorsten Brinkmann, "Vasall van Bröckl", 2011, C-Print, 195 x 150 cm © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2011 (Detail) Gottfried Brockmann, "Der Pfeifenbaum", 1929, 38,5 x 30 cm © Estate Gottfried Brockmann
Extra Dose. Thorsten Brinkmann as a Guest in the Collection

September 3, 2011 – January 22, 2012

A significant part of Thorsten Brinkmann’s artistic strategy comprises chance juxtapositions of objects and contexts—this applies as much to his photography as to his sculptures and room installations. Brinkmann dramatized his own identity by constantly covering himself in veils, making self-portrait photographs without showing his face. Some of these photographic self-portraits we find again in his arrangements for rooms, where the visual vocabulary ranges from wallpaper aesthetic and petty bourgeois to a carnival atmosphere.

Brinkmann—who studied, among other artists, under Bernhard Blume in Hamburg—again and again addresses the meaning of painting in his work. In his photography and installations the artist engages with the issue of how today painting can be defined, being as it is surrounded by and in dialogue with all sorts of techniques, visual phenomena, and artistic strategies. For this year’s presentation of the collection, Thorsten Brinkmann engages with the spatial concept underlying the exhibition through intervention, and, in doing so, interacts at all levels of the three-dimensional museum space.

The imprints he leaves behind leave impressions of obvious and also hidden references with profound meaning and are replete with witty sobriety.
 

Exhibition view "Off We Go Again! The Collection 2011", Photo: Martin Frommhagen, Kiel
Exhibition view "Off We Go Again! The Collection 2011", Photo: Martin Frommhagen, Kiel
Off We Go Again! The Collection 2011

February 26, 2011 – January 22, 2012

Off we go again—is the title of a work by the Danish artist Asger Jorn. In 1979 it was purchased for the Kunsthalle zu Kiel by the Stifterkreis der Kunsthalle, the group of patrons supporting the museums. Of We Go Again—also refers to a new rotational exhibition program of the collection, and will begin with our new director Dr. Anette Hüsch. This presentation is her first impression of the collection and will be on show for a whole year.

This program for presenting the collection follows different art-historical threads, but simultaneously it reveals chronological leaps and bounds as well as confrontations that make up the character of a large collection.

Besides famous works by artists such as Hans Arp, Neo Rauch, Daniel Richter, Emil Nolde, or Ilja Repin, we also show works that have not been on exhibition in a long while, such as the art in our collection by Martin Assig, the SPUR group of artists, and by Irwin or Nikolaus Koliusis. A special selection of videos from the collection supplement the tour of the exhibition. We are showing works of the 1970s and 1980s. A whole room is devoted to Nan Hoover, a pioneer of performance and video art. Additionally you can view video artworks by Bill Viola, Jochen Gerz, and Imi Knoebel.

Louis Gurlitt, "Jütische Landschaft", 1841, 42,5 x 61,5 cm © Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Louis Gurlitt, "Jütische Landschaft", 1841, 42,5 x 61,5 cm © Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Louis Gurlitt. Landscape Drawings from the Prints and Drawings Collection of the Kunsthalle zu Kiel

September 3 – October 16, 2011

Louis Gurlitt (1812–1897) is one of the leading landscape painters of the 19th century. As an art student he was taught the realism of the Copenhagen Art Academy and was also influenced by romantic art. Gurlitt executed many Scandinavian and Southern European landscapes as well as of other countries and toposgraphies. They were exceedingly popular. His special contribution to art is his fascination for the landscape of Schleswig Holstein. Born in Altona, the artist was greatly taken by the region and said of the countryside there that it was “really outstandingly charming and had an incredible richness.”

The Prints and Drawings Collection is presenting Louis Gurlitt's truly breathtaking drawings and studies from its holdings. Around 35 drawings and studies from various phases of the artist’s career are on show.

Lina Kim & Michael Wesely, "Universidade de Brasília", 2004 © Lina Kim & Michael Wesely / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2011
Lina Kim & Michael Wesely, "Universidade de Brasília", 2004 © Lina Kim & Michael Wesely / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2011
Archive Utopia. Project Brasília by Lina Kim and Michael Wesely

May 14 – August 28, 2011

The Brazilian and Korean artist Lina Kim and the German artist Michael Wesely went on a long trip into the present and archival history of the city of Brasilia from 2003 to 2010. On the way they investigated the city's myths and its interesting sites. The exhibition in the Kunsthalle zu Kiel shows the results of an artistic search for the traces of the past. 32 large-format pictures made with long exposures are hung opposite 300 small-format, historical photographs, which the artists had viewed in diverse archives, scanned and digitally restored. Besides the contrast of two separate visual worlds we also can perceive many affinities. The artists focus on the city not only from the viewpoint of the plans it was based on but likewise on the social repercussions of a place that is permanently changing, a city that is as much an architectural monument as it is a dynamic living space.

Kim und Wesely took the photographs with an exposure time from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. A result of the long exposure is that we can trace the path of the sun by a kind of line it leaves in the sky. The pictures have no shadows. Only seldom can we discern a human silhouette or cars. The diffusion of light in the large-format images underscores the utopian character of the city, which Brasilia in fact had right from the start. The historical photographs—which have hitherto largely never been seen by the general public—exhibited alongside the contemporary artworks of Kim and Wesely demonstrate different ways of implementing the medium of photography. The exhibition reconciles photographic documents and artistic abstraction, image genesis and image decay, while also addressing the issues of collective memory and how we react to visual stereotypes.

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, "Der Tod der Maria", 1639, Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, "Der Tod der Maria", 1639, Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Color, Black-and-white, and the Three-dimensional

May 14 - August 28, 2011

The Prints and Drawings Collection presents—by opening its new exhibition rooms—an exciting selection from its 400,000 sheet holdings. These works vividly illustrate the great versatility of the graphic arts, oscillating between color, line, and space. Dancing colored circles in Sonia Delaunay-Terk’s work enter into a dialogue with Sol LeWitt’s strictly minimalist art. The space Johann Christian Reinhardt experienced in the traditional landscape of the early 19th century is transposed and developed in the abstract space of François Morellet’s etchings and Lucio Fontana’s reliefs. But no artist was able to equal Rembrandt in exploring the subtleties of depth and light in the graphic arts. We have the good fortune of being able to present two of his etching masterpieces in the exhibition. They are flanked by Lucebert’s expressive and surreal pen-and-wash drawings and a series of Richard Serra’s impressive landscape etchings.

Philips Wouwerman, "Reisende bei der Rast vor tiefer Flusslandschaft" (Detail), 1649, Oil on canvas, 68 x 98,5 cm, Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Philips Wouwerman, "Reisende bei der Rast vor tiefer Flusslandschaft" (Detail), 1649, Oil on canvas, 68 x 98,5 cm, Kunsthalle zu Kiel

Artists (Selection): Jan van Goyen, Meindert Hobbema, Joos de Momper, Aert van der Neer, Jacob van Ruisdael, David Teniers d.J., Adam Willaerts, Philips Wouwerman, Cuno Amiet, Pierre Bonnard, Auguste Chabaud, Lovis Corinth, Camille Corot, Gustave Courbet, Karl Hofer, Ernst Josephson, Peder Severin Krøyer, Ludwig Meidner, Franz Radziwill, Odilon Redon, Ilja Repin, Christian Rohlfs, Kurt Schwitters, Max Slevogt, Chaim Soutine, Lesser Ury, Eberhard Viegener, Sven Drühl, Wolfram Ebersbach, Ger van Elk, Caroline von Grone, Howard Kanovitz, Roy Lichtenstein, Adolf Luther, Huang Meng, François Morellet, Constant Permeke, Shi-hua Qiu, Markus Raetz, Arnulf Rainer, Albrecht Schnider Kailiang Yang, Bernd und Hilla Becher, Margaret Bourke-White, Stan Douglas, Walker Evans, Thomas Florschuetz, Evelyn Hofer, André Kertész, Marcellvs L., Ingeborg Lüscher, Richard Misrach, Simone Nieweg, Dirk Reinartz, Albert Renger-Patzsch, Boris Savelev, Wolfgang Tillmans.

Views of the World. Landscape in 17th to 21st-century Art

January 28 - April 25, 2011

The term “landscape” denotes both natural environments and those designed and arranged by humankind, urban structures and spiritual landscapes. Our view of what landscape is always mirrors an attitude toward the world. The exhibition Views of the World: Landscape in 17th to 21st-century art shows how the interpretations of landscape in the visual arts are determined by how we—individually or collectively—experience reality and utopian situations, fears, desires, and traumata. In around 200 artworks, we can view landscape interpretations of the various centuries in the different media of painting, photography, and video. Some artworks mirror social and cultural developments in history in a highly differentiated way or even anticipate them. Others present dream-like, melancholy, or even critical counterparts to the reality we experience in everyday life. In the course of the centuries we go through changes, breaks with the past, and periods of great upheaval. Especially the 20th century was replete with crises and catastrophes. And in view of the global threat to the earth’s flora and fauna, we can only view landscape in a fragmentary and indirect way. In a great variety of works, the exhibition reveals how elementary art’s confrontation with landscape is and always was, ranging from Dutch landscape painting of the 17th century—in which we can perceive the awakening consciousness for environment as one that can be felt and experienced—via European painting of the 18th and 19th centuries, through to modern and finally contemporary art. The around 200 outstanding paintings, photographs, and video artworks in the exhibition issue from the extensive collection of landscape pictures that was amassed by Alexander and Silke von Berswordt-Wallrabe. After showing in Kiel, the exhibition will travel on to Wiesbaden, Chemnitz, Maastricht, and Cottbus. Long-term it is planned that these works will be put at the disposal of Ruhr University, Bochum, for educational purposes.

Max Pechstein, "Convent von Monterosso", 1924, Oil on canvas, Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Max Pechstein, "Convent von Monterosso", 1924, Oil on canvas, Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Max Pechstein. A Retrospective of a Passionate Expressionist

September 19, 2010 – January 9, 2011

Max Pechstein (1881–1955) is, alongside Erich Heckel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, a pioneer of expressionism and modern art. The relevance of his artistic oeuvre, however, extends far beyond the famous works of their joint Brücke years. The oeuvre catalogue of Max Pechstein’s oil paintings will be published shortly. Our retrospective was able to profit from this. For the first time ever, our exhibition will show a comprehensive and representative selection of highlights of Pechstein's oeuvre, ranging from the earliest picture that he painted in 1894 at the age of 12 to the last painting by his hand in 1954. Besides works from the modern period we will be mounting works from six decades that have only seldom or never been presented to the public. Furthermore, besides Max Pechstein’s paintings, water colors, drawings, and prints, we will be throwing an eye on the commissions he received for wall paintings, mosaics, and stained glass windows. The exhibition is as interested in the sculptor as it is in the fine-arts craftsman, and illustrated letters and original documents will provide supplementary aspects, extending the already exceptional scope of the exhibition. Max Pechstein, who was formerly a decoration painter apprentice and student at the Dresden School of Applied Arts, was constantly in quest of unspoilt nature and a world untainted by civilization. This pursuit was concretized by the artist when he journeyed to the South Pacific in 1914. His close affinity with nature and his strong creative drive left their mark on the diverse oeuvre of this protagonist of modern art. From September 19 his work is on view at the Kunsthalle zu Kiel.

The exhibition is a joint project of the Kunsthalle zu Kiel and the Schleswig-Holsteinischer Kunstverein in collaboration with Kunstforum Ostdeutsche Galerie, Regensburg, and the Kunstmuseum Ahlen. The Kulturstiftung der Laender with the additional support of the Ernst von Siemens Culture Foundation sponsored the exhibition in the Kunsthalle zu Kiel.