Exhibitions

Past exhibitions

Gottfried Brockmann, "Der Raucher (Selbstbildnis mit Pfeife)", 1928, Öl-Kasein auf Malpappe, 70 x 46 cm © Nachlass Gottfried Brockmann, Foto: Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Gottfried Brockmann, "Der Raucher (Selbstbildnis mit Pfeife)", 1928, Öl-Kasein auf Malpappe, 70 x 46 cm © Nachlass Gottfried Brockmann, Foto: Kunsthalle zu Kiel

"What have I gotten myself into?"
Life and identity in art
The Collection 2013

16 March 2013 – February 2014

What have I gotten myself into? asks the artist Ulrich Meister in his artwork diary. This statement is the title for the 2013 presentation of the collection, which will be exploring the joys of existence and thoughts about how we live and survive. The exhibition addresses the psychological moments of being, of self-questioning and self-examination in all forms and means of art, ranging from intimate diary notes to ostentatious presentations of own corporeality. What have I gotten myself into? is exhibiting artworks that highlight the search for the answers to this question, self-portrayals, wonder and joy, but also the despair of human existence.

Artists: Marina Abramović/Ulay, Albert Aereboe, Iwan Aiwasoffski, Ulrike Andresen, Elsbeth Arlt, Martin Assig, Stephan Balkenhol, Georg Baselitz, Joseph Beuys, Abraham Bloemaert, Christian Boltanski, Victor Bonato, Gottfried Brockmann, Antonio Calderara, Equipo Cronica, Johan Christian Dahl, Rolf-Gunter Dienst,  Peter Doig, O.A. Dschekumina, Marlene Dumas, Harald Duwe, Ulrich Erben, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Lucio Fontana, Heinrich Füger, Bert Gerresheim, Franz Gertsch, Jochen Gerz, K.O. Götz, Hubertus Gojowczyk, Carl Andreas August Goos, Antony Gormley, Johannes Grützke, Erich Heckel, Jan Henderikse, Adolf von Hildebrand, Martin Honert, Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler, Alexej von Jawlensky, Olav Christopher Jenssen, Carl Ludwig Jessen, Sven Johne, Aksel Jørgensen, Howard Kanovitz, Thomas Karp, Georg Friedrich Kersting, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Astrid Klein, Imi Knoebel, Hans Kock, Ilka Kollath, Iwan Kramskoi, Konstantin Kryshitzkij, Shigeko Kubota, Franz von Lenbach, Max Liebermann, Adolf Luther, Ulrich Meister, Mathieu Mercier, Peter Nagel, Kay H. Nebel, Siegfried Neuenhausen, Jacob Nöbbe, Emil Nolde, Rudolf Nonnenkamp, Marcel Odenbach, Roman Opalka, Orlan, Jürgen Ovens, Nam June Paik,  Stefan Panhans, Friedrich Preller, Neo Rauch, Ilja Repin, Raffael Rheinsberg, Gerhard Richter, Auguste Rodin, Gustav Seitz, O. Sitkow, Ben Schonzeit,  Dirk Skreber, Jan Styka, Edwin Scharff, Rudolf Schwarzkogler, Moritz von Schwind, Norbert Schwontkowski, Nikolaj Sinesubow, Renée Sintenis, Walter Stöhrer, Tal R, Jan Voss, Wolf Vostell, Franz Erhard Walther, Corinne Wasmuht, Hermann Werner.

David Shrigley „The Door“ 2007, Animation, Courtesy David Shrigley, Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, Anton Kern, New York, Galleri Nicolai Wallner, Copenhagen, und Yvon Lambert, Paris © 2013 David Shrigley
David Shrigley „The Door“ 2007, Animation, Courtesy David Shrigley, Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, Anton Kern, New York, Galleri Nicolai Wallner, Copenhagen, und Yvon Lambert, Paris © 2013 David Shrigley
Old School
Anachronism in Contemporary Art

27 September 2013 - 26 January 2014
 

For a while now we have been able to observe that art, just as in other areas of everyday life, is returning to old techniques and technologies as well as the visual effects and appearances of the past: New furniture is produced with chipped edges and corners; by simple apps on smartphones, photographs are made to look as if they were taken at the turn of the century; and by a single mouse click, high-resolution video recordings can look like Super 8 film. The visual arts have widely different reasons for seemingly reverting to past art forms and techniques as well as past technologies.

How intensively art follows such angles will be shown in the exhibition Old School as well as the great variety of artistic goals calling for such approaches. Thus the range of exhibits includes masterly rendered miniature paintings and traditional paint production methods as much as the conscious use of long-outdated technical tools, and, not to forget, new interpretations of motifs taken from art of the past. Old School will reveal the guiding principles behind art reverting to the past by appearances as well as what anachronisms have to say about the present and the role of the image.

Artists:
Anita Albus, Martin Assig, Andreas Bunte, Marcel van Eeden, Elger Esser, Larissa Fassler, Olaf Holzapfel, Ulrike Kuschel, Eva and Franco Mattes, Tadej Pogačar, David Shrigley, Taryn Simon and Aaron Swartz.

Johannes Grützke, Bildnis Jens Chrichtian Jensen mit Widmung vom 28.7.1991, Bleistift © VG Bild-Kunst Bonn 2013 (Detail)
Johannes Grützke, Bildnis Jens Chrichtian Jensen mit Widmung vom 28.7.1991, Bleistift © VG Bild-Kunst Bonn 2013 (Detail)
“The point of it all?”
Jens Christian Jensen: Two decades of dedication to Kiel
22 June – 20 October 2013
 
The exhibition pays tribute to the Kunsthalle zu Kiel’s first and independent director Jens Christian Jensen. Its title is a quote from the introduction in the catalogue of new acquisitions from 1971 to 1974. During the period of Jensen’s directorship from 1971 to 1990, he established the Kunsthalle zu Kiel as an international influential hub for contemporary art and had a fundamental impact on the collection. For example, this period bears the stamp of his intensive cultivation of keeping in close touch with young artists who ultimately played leading roles in determining the future of German and international art after 1945. These artists all share a great respect for Jens Christian Jensen, which they sometimes vocalized in highly personal gestures.
 
Many of the artists gave him a special copy of their own publications. In these gifts they included dedications, sketches, and portraits especially for Jens Christian Jensen, making them very unique artist’s books.
 
The exhibition has been mounted in the rooms of the Prints and Drawings Collection with a selection of these books, which Jensen in turn donated to the Kunsthalle. In addition to the books that were given by the artists, the museum will be exhibiting those works they executed that were acquired during the period of Jensen's directorship.

 

HP Zimmer, "Malanggan", 1966-1968, Öl auf Leinwand, 190 x 140 cm, SPUR Archiv-Berlin © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2013 Foto: HP Zimmer Archiv
HP Zimmer, "Malanggan", 1966-1968, Öl auf Leinwand, 190 x 140 cm, SPUR Archiv-Berlin © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2013 Foto: HP Zimmer Archiv

The Third Wave
Gruppe SPUR, pop and politics

25 May – 8 September 2013

SPUR symbolizes a new dawn, resistance and individualism in postwar Germany during the 1950s and 1960s. The Kunsthalle zu Kiel is taking a detailed look at the phenomenon of The Third Wave, which Gruppe SPUR artists brought to life in numerous writings as an art and social movement. It was founded by Lothar Fischer, Heimrad Prem, Helmut Sturm and H. P. Zimmer, whose names are uniquely linked to changes in German society and the art scene after 1945. The exhibition will be showing artworks by Gruppe SPUR and its contemporaries, presenting the avant-garde influences thereon and investigating the group's ideas about what art is and about its political dimensions. The Third Wave—Gruppe SPUR: artists, pop and politics palpably illustrates life of the 1960s between middle-class values and the yearning for freedom, looking at the further consequences of Gruppe SPUR and whether its aftermath can still be felt today.

Artists:

Lothar Fischer, Heimrad Prem, Helmut Sturm, HP Zimmer

Karel Appel, Hans Matthäus Bachmayer, Thomas Baldischwyler, Giacomo Balla, Max Beckmann, Bernadette Corporation, Max Ernst, Guy Debord, Jean Dubuffet, Carsten Fock, Reinhold Heller, Gerhard Hoehme, Asger Jorn, Wassily Kandinsky, Martin Kippenberger, Paul Klee, Uwe Lausen, Lucebert, Malanggan, Jonathan Meese, Albert Mertz, Heino Naujoks, Emil Nolde, Albert Oehlen, Hans Platschek, Jackson Pollock, Daniel Richter, Helmut Rieger, Antoni Tàpies, Wols, Maurice Wyckaert

A catalogue has been published in conjunction with the exhibition
Installationsansicht "Khaled al Khani - The Beginning" für den Schleswig-Holsteinischen Kunstverein, Kunsthalle zu Kiel 2013 © Khaled al Khani, Foto:Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Installationsansicht "Khaled al Khani - The Beginning" für den Schleswig-Holsteinischen Kunstverein, Kunsthalle zu Kiel 2013 © Khaled al Khani, Foto:Kunsthalle zu Kiel

Khaled al Khani - The Beginning
(presented by the Schleswig-Holsteinsicher Kunstverein)

16 March – 8 September 2013

After commencing the exhibition series of the Schleswig-Holsteinische Kunstverein last year, in 2013 we will be continuing with the Syrian artist Khaled al Khani (b. 1975), whom we have invited to mount an exhibition in a space reserved for his art at the Kunsthalle. The artist studied painting in Hama and Damascus. In 2011 he fled Syria and is living in exile in Paris. Khaled al Khani’s expressive, figurative painting is filled with impressions in his homeland. The central topic of the artist’s work is freedom. Khaled al Khani has produced a room installation made especially for the exhibition at the Kunsthalle.

 

Franz Ackermann, Nonstop you (Teheran), 2012 mixed media on aludibond © Franz Ackermann  Foto: Galerie Meyer-Riegger, Berlin
Franz Ackermann, Nonstop you (Teheran), 2012 mixed media on aludibond © Franz Ackermann Foto: Galerie Meyer-Riegger, Berlin

Everything New!
New Acquisitions for the Collection of Prints and Drawings

February 9 – June 9, 2013

In the current exhibition, the Prints and Drawings Collection is presenting a selection of its most important acquisitions from the year 2000 to today, reflecting key trends in contemporary art. All the artworks on show are being presented to the public for the first time. The exhibition is a documentation of how the Kunsthalle is continually expanding its Prints and Drawings Collection. A collection is only truly alive if it constantly grows through purchases, gifts, or permanent loans. In this way it points to the future as well as refers to the history of the collection, and brings current trends in art together with historical approaches.

Artists: Franz Ackermann, Henry Bond, Peter Doig, Nils Erik Gjerdevik, Carsten Höller, Lina Kim, Bjarne Melgaard, Pavel Pepperstein, Daniel Richter, Michael Wesely.

Ausstellungsansicht "ars viva-Preis 2012/13-Systeme" © Kunsthalle zu Kiel Foto: Helmut Kunde
Ausstellungsansicht "ars viva-Preis 2012/13-Systeme" © Kunsthalle zu Kiel Foto: Helmut Kunde

ars viva award 2012/13 — Systems
Simon Denny, Melvin Moti and Özlem Günyol & Mustafa Kunt

February 9 – May 12, 2013

The ars viva awards of the Kulturkreis der deutschen Wirtschaft im BDI e.V. have been acknowledging outstanding young artists living in Germany since fifty-nine years. Each year the selection of winners takes place according to a different thematic focus relevant to contemporary art and fundamental social issues. Systems is the subject for the 2013 awards.
Three artists were chosen on account of their international approaches that profoundly showcased this year’s topic in highly divergent ways. Thus we have the New Zealand artist Simon Denny who, in his work, engages with role of digital media images today such as TV, or Melvin Moti, who lives in Rotterdam and Berlin and examines the way information is processed in the human brain. Özlem Günyol & Mustafa Kunt, originally from Turkey, trace the structures of social and political systems and how they form identities.

Christian Rohlfs, "Allee im Belvedere von Weimar" (Detail),  1899, pastel on paper, 22,5 x 29 cm, Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Christian Rohlfs, "Allee im Belvedere von Weimar" (Detail), 1899, pastel on paper, 22,5 x 29 cm, Kunsthalle zu Kiel

 

 

Overwhelmingly Audacious
All of Rohlfs in Kiel
November 10, 2012 – February 24, 2013

To commemorate the 75th anniversary of Christian Rohlfs’ decease (b. December 22, 1849, in Niendorf/Kreis Segeberg; d. January 8, 1938, in Hagen), the Kunsthalle zu Kiel has mounted a large exhibition of over 300 artworks by this exceptional artist. The greater part of the drawings, watercolors, paintings, and prints in the show will be on view to the general public for the very first time. The Kunsthalle zu Kiel’s extensive holdings boast the largest collection of Rohlfs’ work to be found worldwide in a museum. Through the exhibition, the artist’s use of highly diverse materials can be palpably experienced, not to mention his often unique application of the various technical processes involved.
Sponsored by the Ernst von Siemens Kulturstiftung, a catalogue of the collection has been published.

Albrecht Dürer, "Der heilige Hieronymus im Gehäus", 1514, copper engraving, 24,9 x 18,9 cm © Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Albrecht Dürer, "Der heilige Hieronymus im Gehäus", 1514, copper engraving, 24,9 x 18,9 cm © Kunsthalle zu Kiel

Albrecht Dürer. Masterpieces from the Collection
August 25, 2012 - January 20, 2013

Albrecht Dürer’s great significance as an artist is primarily due to his graphic work, which already earned him fame throughout Europe during his lifetime. He elevated the woodcut to the status of an independent work of art by using exceptionally fine lines and subtle contrasts of light and shade. And he imbued the copperplate engraving with hitherto unequalled expression and freed the medium from its traditional function as a mere means of reproducing paintings. Dürer was the first artist to include his monogram on his graphic prints and make his authorship known. The Prints and Drawings Collection is presenting, among other works, the key prints from Dürer’s famous Apocalypse. In 1498 this series of prints brought him fame as an artist. St. Jerome from the “Graphic Masterpieces” series is on display too. Additionally, we are presenting Dürer’s renowned prints such as The Rhinoceros or St Eustace, the most beautiful prints from his Life of the Virgin, as well as prints from the lesser known series he called “Schlechte Holzwerks” (poorer-quality woodcuts), which characteristically have less complex compositions.

Erik Kessels, "24 hrs in photos", 2011 1 Million photos, Variable size,  Owned by the artist © Erik Kessels Photo: Jeroen Bijl
Erik Kessels, "24 hrs in photos", 2011 1 Million photos, Variable size, Owned by the artist © Erik Kessels Photo: Jeroen Bijl

The Human Senses and Perception in Contemporary Art
July 14 – October 21, 2012

What sort of smell does art have, how does it taste, sound, and feel? We follow established accepted codes of behavior, especially in museum exhibition space, for viewing—and in the meantime also for listening to art. But they are inadequate if we wish to extend our experience of art to the senses of smell, taste, or touch.
The works of art in the Kunsthalle zu Kiel’s current special exhibition occupy, to an extent, entire museum rooms. They all engage with our faculties in a way so that we can consciously experience them. The exhibition addresses issues such as the role our body navigation systems play in contemporary art, to what extent does sensual experience have an independent artistic value, and whether its value goes beyond hedonistic experience. The show also investigates our sixth sense, subconscious perception, and the 12 senses of anthroposophy.
Erik Kessels' spectacular installation intentionally seeks to overwhelm the viewer. Kessels has downloaded around one million images that are freely accessible to the public on the internet platform flickr and literally shovelled heaps of many thousands of these pictures into the exhibition space. Visitors are made to wade through literally piles of photographic prints. Thus in 24 hrs in photos, the artist depicts how private and public spheres have become interlinked, and we are able to palpably experience the inexhaustible spate of images of our times. Heribert Friedl has painted an installation on the wall that targets our olfactory receptors. Most people don’t even espy the artwork, but they all can distinctly smell it. Addressing our olfactory senses, Forest (Klein Elmeloo) conjures up the countryside and the flora of the site where the Kunsthalle now stands. Sonja Alhäuser's installation Ausschnitt (Slice), which was realized especially for the exhibition, is made up of edible sweets such as marzipan and chocolate. The artist entices Kunsthalle visitors to destroy the artwork, despite its museum framework, by literally and directly digesting it, bit by bit. Via Lewandowsky too deviates from accepted and standard museum situations: In an empty room we experience no more than the buzzing of a fly. The purely acoustic perception of movement in space incites the audience to draw on the powers of the imagination. In contrast, Vadim Fishkin adresses the public very directly in his installation. Entertainment, action, and exhibitionism—his Snow_Show addresses all our faculties and directs attention to entertainment formats other than museum modes of representation, pronouncing the visitors themselves to be the actual exhibition objects.
Besides entire-room installations, the exhibition also shows painted panels, objects, and video installations—including works by Carsten Nicolai, Tim Eitel, Louise Bourgeois, and Bill Viola—with each artist framing the individual senses in very different ways. All the artworks in the exhibition can be comprehended both sensually and intellectually. This is due to the fact that every faculty that is addressed directly triggers associations that involve other senses as well: By concentrating on such processes, the exhibition The Human Senses and Perception in Contemporary Art can, among other things, be understood as a comment on today’s world, where the speed and complexity of exchanging information or virtual forms of social contact strongly impact habits of human perception, our ability to concentrate, and individual intuition.

A catalogue has been published in conjunction with the exhibition

Ludwig Dettmann, „Frauen mit einem Kind am Strand“ (Detail) 1894, Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Ludwig Dettmann, „Frauen mit einem Kind am Strand“ (Detail) 1894, Kunsthalle zu Kiel
Good Company. Lotte Hegewisch and Patrons of the Arts: From Georg Friedrich Kersting to Gerhard Richter

February 18 – June 24, 2012

Who is an art collector and why? How can we trace the history of relationships between private patronage and public institutions, and what are their prospects in the future? On the occasion of the 190th birthday of Charlotte Hegewisch, patron of the Kunsthalle zu Kiel, the exhibition Good Company tells—from the point of view of civil commitment—the story of the history of the museum. The selection and mounting of the around 250 works by artists such as Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt, Ilja Repin, Max Liebermann, Emil Nolde, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Marlene Dumas, and Tal R as well as historical photographs provide interesting and valuable insights into what motivates art collectors. Additionally, we learn about the private and political circles in which Lotte Hegewisch moved, the history of the Schleswig-Holsteinischer Kunstverein, and the cultural, political, and social situation of Schleswig-Holstein in the latter half of the 19th century. The artist Wiebke Siem, who was born in Kiel and now lives and works in Berlin, made an installation especially for the exhibition. The installation takes up an entire room and is appealing in a surrealistic sort of way, awakening associations of social norms while adopting a visual language that is reminiscent of the early styles of modern art. We are likewise focusing on additional individual collections, for example those of four well-known patrons of the arts who lived during the 19th and 20th centuries: Albert Hänel, Ludwig Gustav Heinzelmann, Carl August Petersen, and Paul Wassily. They all represent essential building blocks for the Kunsthalle zu Kiel Collection, as well as a still-ongoing private collection from Holstein where the initiator wishes to remain unknown. Furthermore, the exhibition Good Society touches on relationships between public and private collections, museums and funding today. Therefore the views of museum directors, art collectors, curators, and gallery owners on how such relationships can be expected to develop in the future are likewise part of the exhibition.
 

Muthesius Art, Spatial Strategies, and Design Prize

May 16 – May 28, 2012

The Muthesius Society, that is the “Friends" of the Muthesius Academy of Fine Arts and Design, has launched, for the second time, the Muthesius Art, Spatial Strategies, and Design Prize competition. It is open to all graduates of the Muthesius Academy of Fine Arts and Design who completed their studies in the preceding two years. The criteria for winning the prize are exceptional quality, achievement, and innovation in contemporary art and design. The award includes prize money of three thousand euros respectively for the categories art, spatial strategies, and design. Two prominent juries have selected winners from 60 submissions, and they will be shown in the Kunsthalle zu Kiel from May 16 to May 28, 2012.
With the award and the public presentation of outstanding works, the Muthesius Society wishes to make the achievements and significance of the Muthesius Academy of Fine Arts and Design known to the public at large. Since 2010, the art prize releases a call for candidates from the graduates of the Muthesius Academy of Fine Arts every two years, and is awarded by the "friends of the academy”, the Muthesius Fördergesellschaft. A preliminary jury nominates seven works in each area, and these works are then presented to the public in the Kunsthalle zu Kiel. A supraregional jury then chooses the winners from the exhibited selection. But public opinion counts too: Besides the Muthesius Prize, a prize for the public’s favourite has been introduced also.
 

Ernst Barlach, "Das Wiedersehen (Thomas und Christus)", Bronze after a plaster model from 1926, 47,8 x 19 x 12 cm, © Kunsthalle zu Kiel Foto: Martin Frommhagen
Ernst Barlach, "Das Wiedersehen (Thomas und Christus)", Bronze after a plaster model from 1926, 47,8 x 19 x 12 cm, © Kunsthalle zu Kiel Foto: Martin Frommhagen
The Collection. Sculpture-Figures

March 20 – May 13, 2012

With only a few exceptions, most of the Kunsthalle zu Kiel’s sculptures stem from the 20th century. With a range extending from the modern to post-war art, most of our pieces are figurative, full- and half-length figures, two-figure groups and nudes, torsos and portrait busts. Constructivist and abstract, approaches embracing found object and installations all expand notions of art and sculpture, and some works can only be comprehended via their title. The materials that initially dominate in sculpture are bronze, stone, to which we can add plaster of Paris and a variety of ceramic techniques as well. Later wood, lead and various mixed techniques appear on the stage. The formal and thematic range of our sculptural works and objects range from imitative of the real to the ideal, from borrowings to physical production processes, from the visible and comprehensible to visual denial strategies.

Chiharu Shiota, "Stairway", 2012, Installationview at Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Sunhi Mang, © VG Bild Kunst, Bonn 2012
Chiharu Shiota, "Stairway", 2012, Installationview at Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Sunhi Mang, © VG Bild Kunst, Bonn 2012

Chiharu Shiota
(presented by the Schleswig-Holsteinsicher Kunstverein)

January 14 – April 29, 2012

To start the series of exhibitions of the Schleswig-Holsteinischer Kunstverein scheduled to take place on a regular basis from 2012 onwards, a room installation was made especially for the arts society. Chiharu Shiota does performances and is indebted to theater, while also taking recourse to drawing and designing installations that often fill entire rooms. A characteristic of her works is black cotton thread that she weaves into or about tables, clothing, a piano, or even herself, to name just a few objects that are integrated into her art. The webs of black lines that she constructs in this way have the appearance of drawings in space. They trigger associations such as lifelines of our palms, paths of communication, or labyrinths of memory.
Essentially she turns exhibition rooms into stages. We easily recognize the stamp of her teachers Rebecca Horn and Marina Abramovic in her distinctly corporal and spatial perception, as well as in the performative quality of her works. Chiharu Shiota has made a new installation that extends throughout an entire room especially for the exhibition at the Kunsthalle. Like her other works it is temporary and can be viewed for the duration of the exhibition only.