Exhibitions

Past exhibitions 2016-2017

Ausstellungsansicht, Von Angst bis Wollen. Ludger Gerdes, "Nie" (1991) Foto: Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Helmut Kunde
Ausstellungsansicht, Von Angst bis Wollen. Ludger Gerdes, "Nie" (1991) Foto: Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Helmut Kunde

From Anxiety to Volition. Ludger Gerdes
February 11th, 2017 to April 30th, 2017


With the exhibition “From Anxiety to Volition. Ludger Gerdes”, the Kunsthalle zu Kiel dedicates the first retrospective to artist Ludger Gerdes (1954-2008) nearly a decade after his untimely death. Sculptures, installations, paintings and works on paper as well photographs and slide projections offer a vivid insight into Ludger Gerdes’ complex and varied oeuvre. His artistic beginnings at the end of the 1970s will be shown as well as his sculptural work of the 1980s and his almost unknown photographic work that he produced after 2003. The exhibition and accompanying catalogue contribute to the rediscovery of one of the central artistic positions from recent art history, which significantly influenced the German art scene of the 1980s. In his final years, Gerdes was a professor in Kiel. The project is a cooperation with the Stiftung Kunstfonds - Archiv für Künstlernachlässe (Art Fund Foundation - Archive for Artists’ Estates) and with the art museums of the Kunstmuseen Krefeld. The exhibition will be ccompanied by a catalogue published by the Verlag für moderne Kunst that presents the oeuvre of Ludger Gerdes in its breadth and diversity.

Käthe Kollwitz, „Selbstbildnis“, 1924 Lithographie © Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Sönke Ehlert
Käthe Kollwitz, „Selbstbildnis“, 1924 Lithographie © Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Sönke Ehlert

Käthe Kollwitz: I Want to Take Effect
November 19, 2016 - March 5, 2017

At the turn of the year 2016/17, the Collection of Prints and Drawings will exhibit a central German twentieth-century artist: Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945). In finding her own very individual style, she depicted the social woes of her times in her work together with poverty, death and grief – themes strongly marked by her personal experiences.
The Collection of Prints and Drawings will exhibit several central series of graphic art by the artist such as A Weaver’s Revolt (1893-97), which earned Kollwitz recognition as an artist, Peasants’ War (1902/03-1908) and a Suite of seven woodcuts entitled War (1922/23). Major works such as Woman with Dead Child (1903) or Help Russia (1921) belong to the collections alongside her impressive self-portraits and will form part of the exhibition.
 

Christian Rohlfs, „Der Prophet“ 1917, Öl auf Leinwand, 110,5 x 61,5 cm © Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Martin Frommhagen
Christian Rohlfs, „Der Prophet“ 1917, Öl auf Leinwand, 110,5 x 61,5 cm © Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Martin Frommhagen

Everything under the Sun
October 1, 2016 – January 29, 2017


In a decisive phase of modern art – in the context of the avant-garde movement – the inspiration of Christianity in the Western tradition yielded to interwoven, yet often juxtaposing strands of artistic autonomy. New forms of expression increasingly determined artistic experiments. Personal attitudes, own ideas, material, form and colour shaped the works of autonomous artists – beyond or only tinged by traditional subjects and motifs. The time period of the German Reich’s existence, which was defined by the prevalent political situation, created the framework in which sacred, spiritual and transcendental concepts of painting were negotiated. Spiritual and political aspects both touched and repelled each other in equal measure during the German Reich. These dynamics formed a substantial contribution to the birth of classic modern art.
Artists: Ernst Barlach, Max Beckmann, Karl Caspar, Lovis Corinth, Josef Eberz, Conrad Felixmüller, Eduard von Gebhardt, Adolf Hölzel, Karl Hofer, Max Klinger, Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Max Liebermann, Franz Marc, Wilhelm Morgner, Emil Nolde, Christian Rohlfs, Josef Scheurenberg, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, Wilhelm Steinhausen, Hermann Stenner, Hans Thoma, Fritz von Uhde, Albert Weisgerber, and others.

The exhibition is supported by the Kulturstiftung des Landes Schleswig-Holstein (Cultural Foundation of State of Schleswig Holstein).

Peter Cornelius, „Faust und Wagner unter den Spaziergängern vor dem Tore [Osterspaziergang]“ aus der Folge von 12 Blättern „Bilder zu Goethe’s Faust“, 1816, Kupferstich © Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Sönke Ehlert
Peter Cornelius, „Faust und Wagner unter den Spaziergängern vor dem Tore [Osterspaziergang]“ aus der Folge von 12 Blättern „Bilder zu Goethe’s Faust“, 1816, Kupferstich © Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Sönke Ehlert

A Faust for the eyes. Illustrations of Goethe’s Masterpiece
July 16, 2016 to November 6, 2016


Goethe's Faust is considered to be the most significant work of German literature. Time and again, artists have explored this renowned tragedy in their images. This is also true of Peter Cornelius, whose drawings were highly praised by Goethe, and were published exactly 200 years ago in 1816 as a series of copperplate engravings. The Collection of Prints and Drawings presents these impressive folios together with nineteenth and early twentieth-century illustrations from its collections.
Artists: Peter Cornelius, Georg Kolbe, Moritz Retzsch, Ferdinand Ruscheweyh, Julius Thaeter and others.

Raffael Rheinsberg, „Gebrochen Deutsch“, Zerbrochene Straßenschilder aus Ost-Berlin, ca. 1770 Teil, © Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Martin Frommhagen
Raffael Rheinsberg, „Gebrochen Deutsch“, Zerbrochene Straßenschilder aus Ost-Berlin, ca. 1770 Teil, © Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Martin Frommhagen

Emeka Ogboh – Song of the Germans Guest of the collection presentation Gebrochen Deutsch (Broken German)
March 12, – July 24, 2016

Emeka Ogboh’s acoustic installation The Song of the Germans was created in 2015 for the Venice Biennale. The work has since been purchased by the Federal Republic of Germany’s Contemporary Art Collection and will be shown in summer at the Kunsthalle zu Kiel. It consists of the German national anthem being sung in ten indigenous languages from the African continent: individual voices swell to form a choir. Proceeding from Ogboh’s work, the collection presentation will deal with the generation of collective identity, presenting among others Raffael Rheinsberg’s expansive installation Gebrochen Deutsch (Broken German). The broken street signs, scattered on the ground like a fragmented puzzle, rouse the viewer to reflect on historical-political connections, social processes and the concept of a ‘nation’.

Miriam Cahn, "beschuss", 30.11.2008 Öl auf Leinwand, 190 x 270 cm © Miriam Cahn, Courtesy Meyer Riegger, Foto: Kunsthalle zu Kiel Helmut Kunde
Miriam Cahn, "beschuss", 30.11.2008 Öl auf Leinwand, 190 x 270 cm © Miriam Cahn, Courtesy Meyer Riegger, Foto: Kunsthalle zu Kiel Helmut Kunde

miriam cahn – AT EYE LEVEL

March 12, – July 24, 2016
AT EYE LEVEL presents some 130 works from all phases of the artist’s career from the 1970s to the present day. Miriam Cahn works in several genres: chalk drawing, painting, text, performance, plastic arts, sculpture and film. Genres, styles and years of production are mixed, and so the exhibition as a whole becomes a new, transient work. Miriam Cahn shows in artistic terms what it might mean to meet oneself, others and the world AT EYE LEVEL. 

We would like to thank the Swiss cultural foundation Pro Helvetia for supporting this exhibition. 

A catalogue will be published on March 24, 2016 in conjunction with the exhibition: 
Publisher: Anette Hüsch
Texts: Miriam Cahn, Anette Hüsch
112 pages, ISBN 978-3-937208-48-0
 
 

 

 

Muthesius Prize for Art, Space and Design
June 18, 2016 – June 26, 2016

Award ceremony: June 23, 2016, 6 p.m.

A week-long exhibition with a festival feel: outstanding graduates from the Muthesius University will show and comment on their own innovative works in the fields of art and design.

Thomas Judisch, „Venus von Medici“, 2015, Gips, Holz, Foto: Thomas Judisch
Thomas Judisch, „Venus von Medici“, 2015, Gips, Holz, Foto: Thomas Judisch

Thomas Judisch – Today Was Yesterday
April 23, 2016  – June 26, 2016

An exhibition by the Schleswig-Holstein Kunstverein (Art Society) in the Antikensammlung (Collection of Classical Antiquities), Kunsthalle zu Kiel

In his series of works Today Was Yesterday, Thomas Judisch explores traditional imagery in sculptures from antiquity. In the setting of the Antiquity Collection, the artist’s attention is particularly focused on the plinths and supports of famous sculptures such as the Capitoline Venus or the Apollo Belvedere. Viewed as functional necessities, these supports barely register in the consciousness of the general public. Without the figure that it originally supported, the plinth, relieved of its functionality, becomes a work of art in its own right. In this context, the new object – a revenant of an earlier form – is shifted to centre stage in the question of what art is, and the role of structural elements and function. In so doing, Thomas Judisch also draws our attention to the way in which our visual habits are shaped by convention.

Elsbeth Arlt „Buchdruck II“, 1983 Objektdruck 1/3 © Elsbeth Arlt, Foto: Sönke Ehlert
Elsbeth Arlt „Buchdruck II“, 1983 Objektdruck 1/3 © Elsbeth Arlt, Foto: Sönke Ehlert

Ash, Thread, Glue
March 26, 2016 – July 3, 2016

The exhibition is a collection of works by artists who implement unusual and surprising methods using paper materials and graphic art techniques. The focus is not by any means merely on art made out of paper. If threads merge with lines to form a motif, can this still be seen as a drawing? Why does an artist apologise to Dürer with the words Sorry, Albrecht in her picture title ­and what place does the ash of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull have on a sheet of paper? How can graphic art be three-dimensional?

In around 25 artistic positions Ash, Thread, Glue explores the unusual, contemporary experiment made on, out of – and sometimes without – paper. 

 

Antonio Tempesta, „Römerschlacht“, um 1610 Feder in Braun, braun laviert, schwarze Kreide @ Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Sönke Ehlert (Detail)
Antonio Tempesta, „Römerschlacht“, um 1610 Feder in Braun, braun laviert, schwarze Kreide @ Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Foto: Sönke Ehlert (Detail)

Furious and virtuous. Italian drawings of the 16th to 18th century
October 31, 2015 – March 13, 2016

Italian drawings from the 16th to the 18th century are considered to be the essence of artistic creation per se. A virtuoso pen stroke, a sovereign composition, the beginnings of an idea for a masterpiece – the drawing witnesses an artistic immediacy that puts an idea onto paper and lends an artwork its preliminary form. Nowhere is this process more graceful and accomplished than in Italian drawings from the Renaissance and baroque periods. Even today, these works, which most commonly depict religious subjects, but also mythological and historical events, allow the viewer to trace the movement of the artist’s hand in the drawing – an often furious series of pen strokes.

For the first time the Kunsthalle zu Kiel is showing a selection of around 40 expert drawings from the Collection of Prints and Drawings, including works by Paolo Anesi, Giovanni Francesco Barbieri gen. Il Guercino, Simone Cantarini, Giovanni Francesco Grimaldi, Elisabetta Sirani, Francesco Solimena, Antonio Tempesta and Pietro Testa.